A Lecture Response: Promoting Justice by Dr. Jacqueline Temple

Tonight I was privileged to attend the retirement presentation of one of our faculty at Portland State University. She spoke on inclusion and her experiences with thought leaders throughout her career. As a consummate educator she provided question prompts on each table and had us respond and ask those questions.

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She shared personal stories of her own lived experience as a person of color. Her travails as a women of color pursuing a life in academia might seem like fantastical stories from ancient history to students today. Her ethnography documents momentous changes in our society but also illuminates how much further we have to go.

She defined Inclusion and Diversity:

Platforms for critical conversations and courageous actions across differences that are pervasive… Where diverse knowledge, experiences, histories, and cultures are affirmed.

She also described obstacles to inclusion:

Push back: the space between the ‘talk and walk’

She went on to describe her framework for inclusion as something that looks different wherever you go. It is situational. Not only this, but it is knowledge dependent. She defined knowledge on the institutions, people within them, community, students, parents, and policy makers.

Too many children have been marginalized.

Education depends on inclusion and diversity. Our curriculum, whether textbooks or lesson plans or another artifact, must be examined closely. Referring to Paulo Freire Dr. Temple discusses how she wants more than integration but participation that leads to transformation.

During her Fulbright experience she worked in Finland on their burgeoning needs related to diversity. Her scholarly inquiry there became both an expiration outside but also introspection around her own life.

From visiting a K market and discovering challenges unknown:

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To living overseas during the attacks on the World Trade Towers and Pentagon – worrying for her daughter in Washington DC:

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Through this experience she found herself othered and yet accepted. This led to literacy programs between two elementary schools in both countries. Two multi-lingual schools exchanging thoughts, ideas, and people.

Dr. Temple ended her talk with thank you in several languages and asked for our reflections. It was a somber, informative and transformative retirement experience.

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ISTE – Monday Morning

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Morning!

Today I am heading off to ISTE. Actually I have been here for the last few days. Today is the first full official conference day. The events of the weekend got me to reflecting a bit. Reflecting on games in education.

During the Saturday activities we were rehashing old topics and I was feeling fearful that I was not going to experience the inspiration I have felt at prior ISTE conferences. Then I got a call/email from someone I’ve worked with regarding Google Apps for Education asking for some help with Google Voice. Sherry Bosch wanted to make sure the system worked for the Epic Leadership program Monday morning. Since I was attending she wanted to keep thing quiet and not reveal why she needed this to work. Nothing like a mystery, right?

Since I know the facilitator, Peggy Sheehy, and had already completed the online quests (amazing!), I already had a strong sense of what the Google Voice was for. Still…I decided my best course of action was to beard Peggy in her lair (hotel) and offer to help. At the end of a couple hours getting components of one massively fun Alternative Reality Game (ARG), which was the backbone of the Epic Leadership experience, I was inspired!

It is amazing the kind of work and collaboration a small group of enthusiastic professionals can do when they put their minds to it. Peggy is a maestro of orchestrating games for learning. Kae Novak was instrumental in pumping up the crowd and organizing. The bricoleurs drove excitement and facilitation to levels I would not have dreamt up.

So I am back to inspired – just in time for my presentation this morning.

PS: My Jane Mcgonigal video mash-up will come soon. Probably after the conference.

Meeting My Heroes

Meeting my edugeek heroes this week. Yesterday I spent two hours listening to Chris Dede’s panel of Edtech superpowers talk about Augmented Reality. Today I shook hands with Henry Jenkins and Craig Watkins while listening to James Paul Gee deride propensities for ignoring evidence in favor of assumptions.

If I collapse it is not due to lack of happiness and hero worship.

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OETC – Take Aways

Yarn Connection: Life via technology.

Opening activity including a yarn led interaction that involved Google Presentation tools.

At a recent OETC event I had the chance to meet a great bunch of educators. This event celebrated the achievements of the Title IID EdTech Grants. There were three consecutive sessions as well as an opening activity using yarn that progressed to the building of some interesting Google presentations as well as a great closing keynote which I missed.

Before the event began Yolanda Ramos from ISTE sat at my table and shared some information about an upcoming grant related to mobile learning. Apparently Verizon has put together a grant directed towards education. This is exciting news and I look forward to seeing what direction that heads in. With any luck I can get involved as a member of the SIG or in other ways.

The sessions contained too much information to share here so I encourage everyone to look up the presentations themselves at the OETC website: http://teach.oetc.org/arra/celebration

STEM Education Infographic

Continuing my kick with infographics I wanted to go ahead and share this one on STEM education in the United States. While I believe some of the data is misleading and that this does not do a quality job of encouraging more “STEM” folks to join the ranks of teachers it does use a variety of interesting graphs. I think the missing element here relates to the aesthetic qualities that should tie together a theme in an infographic.

Teach.com STEM Infographic
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