Currently Reading….

Kid starts strong to demoralize the competition.A couple weeks ago I went to the AACTE conference in Florida as well as the Intel Teach Summit 2013. Both were interesting but something that remains on my mind is a conversation I had with representatives for Harvard Review. They suggested I write an article about what I am currently reading in relation to Game-Based Learning. Since I work through articles, books, and media regarding this curricular movement on a daily basis I have a hard time even quantifying my reading. On the other hand there are a few professional development activities that include reading which I am currently involved with:

Level Up Gaming: I really need to get my act together and share my first posting here.

Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS): I am also taking a workshop series related to the science standards.

Courses at Portland State University:

Doctoral Studies Pro-Seminar – This course provides an interesting springboard for a variety of topics. I never quite know what we will end up with at the end of class.

Ed Policy & Politics – I am extremely excited to start this course. Politics are always interesting if often frustrating. The potential for wild discussions is pretty high considering the make-up of my cohort.

Leadership Seminar – We are going back to working on our research commentaries which means I can continue exploring research and literature; something I haven’t been able to do winter term.

LGBTQ Advocacy K12 – This experimental course for the department offers some interesting possibilities. We only meet three Saturdays but I am sure they are going to involve some interesting conversations and struggles.

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AACTE 2013

Screen Shot 2013-03-03 at 2.07.40 PMFilled with Deans, administrators, and power brokers in teacher education AACTE should have been intimidating. Luckily I was armed with a cohort of able professors should things get out of hand.

Actually I had a great time. There was a limited number of sessions but networking ruled over paper presentations and workshops anyways. I also met a couple other doctoral students. One has just as much interest in educational technology as I which was nice considering the atmosphere. In fact there were quite a few sessions in this area. Much of what was shared in these sessions appeared dated coming from my ISTE and cutting edge (someone said  bleeding before) perspective on technology but it was exciting to see who attended these sessions.

Looking forward to further developing some relationships and we’ll see what the future holds.

Inclusive Leadership: A Running Definition

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Today I started an organizational leadership course and decided I needed to start a definition of “Inclusive Leadership”. To that end I am starting a definition with this post and plan to submit future posts with revised definitions. Professor Temple definitely has a great style and way of including the entire classroom so I have a feeling I will be running this posting weekly…

An inclusive leader really wants to learn about the complexity of people and exploring the benefits of the diversity around them. They need to ask difficult questions to confront stereotypes and discrimination and work through the conflicts, willingly struggling with their own beliefs. These beliefs are informed by the leader’s own cultural identity and it is important for leaders to internalized and understand their own unique and complex cultural identity and how it impacts their perspective.

In order to challenge their own beliefs a leader must work to be an active listener. They need, not simple to listen in order to respond but to listen with the desire to understand. Through this they may better separate stereotypes from individuals and form honest relationships. Through this they can start seeing differences as assets rather than barriers. The ideas and opinions may differ drastically but as contributions to the whole they provide a powerful whole composed of these unique contributions.